The Return of Western Attire

Aaron Garcia circa 3rd Grade

It’s been several years since I’ve worn western attire. I’ve had my Lucchese boots since I was 15; I’m now 30. I did wear them on many occasions with my everyday outfits, at formal events, and Sundays for church. But as time went on, I opted for a comfortable pair of slip Sketchers.

Aaron Garcia, age 15. A few days after receiving a pair of Lucchese boots as a gift.
Aaron Garcia circa Junior Year of High School. Wearing boots with Tuxedo Tails.
Lucchese Teju Lizard skin boots. The official color is known as “peanut brittle.” These boots were made in San Antonio, Texas likely in the 1970s before the boot-making operations moved to El Paso. I have had these for at least 15 years now.

Last night I walked into Boot Barn for the first time. Kara offered to buy me a hat. I took her up on the offer. And once, with a cowboy hat selected, I decided it was time to get a new western belt. I haven’t worn one in many years because I outgrew it – too many great burgers!

Cody James appears to be the in-store brand of Boot Barn. It wasn’t hard to end up buying several Cody James merchandise. It was the first hat I picked up, and I liked it. I did try several others.

My pull-up mask for COVID-19 reminds me a lot of a bandana. When I first started wearing, I thought it resembled a modern cowboy.

I chose a belt that had a belt buckle already. Even though I plan to change it for The State of Texas Seal belt buckle I have. I need to find it first. Just in case, I chose a belt with a buckle that I would enjoy. I like longhorns.

After dusting off my boots that I’ve had for 15 years, I decided to research what they were. Right now, I believe them to be anywhere from 34 to 51 years old. This is much older than the 15 years I’ve had them for.

My boots have been worn a lot over the years, and it shows. When I first received them, they were nearly in mint condition. I tend to be rough with my shoes, so it’s incredible that they’ve survived this long! My Sketchers are regularly replaced every six months it seems. And only after having deep holes in them.

Granted, Lucchese boots are better made, I would imagine, for their price tag. Here’s a video of how Lucchese boots are made.

And while we’re on the subject, here’s a video on how cowboy hats are made.

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By Aaron Garcia

If it's digital, I'm into it. This would include video production, graphic design, web administration, digital photography, and anything related to computers in general.

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